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Welcome to Mount Tom Lodge E-mail

Photo Courtesy of Senior Warden Robert O'Neill
 
Come Join Us for Dinner E-mail
Mount Tom Lodge would enjoy having you come by and join us for dinner.  We have a dinner the first Friday of every month except July and August.  Please check the Up Comin Events to right to see what is on the menu for next month.  If you are planning on coming to the next dinner, we ask that you make a reservation; this is to ensure that we plan for enough people as well as to greet you and introduce you to some of our members while you are there.

We do ask for an $8.00 donation for dinner.

Also, we collect non-perishable food donations for Kate's Kitchen and Margret's Pantry; if you can, we ask that you bring a can or two to help those in need.

Reservation Link.
 
For a map and directions, please go to our Directions page.
 
Mount Tom Lodge
RESTORED TO LIGHT PDF Print E-mail
Public - Public Home
Written by JMG   
Friday, 04 March 2011 13:28

A faint light shining for a space;
A breath of wind upon the face;
A stirring in the mist; a sigh;
A sense of distance, height and sky;
A little wave of melody !
O but how beautiful to see
The light leaf dance upon the tree,
The bloom upon the hedgerow stirr'd
By the transport of a singing bird,
And - after darkness and eclipse-
The sun upon the sails of ships,
All up and down the dancing sea !
O but how beautiful to hear
A little whisper in the ear,
A smaller voice than note of bird,
A still small voice, a mighty word,
A whisper in the heart to say
That God is not so far away !

- A. E. Waite.

 
Wistariahurst - Mount Tom Lodge PDF Print E-mail
Public - Massachusetts
Written by JMG   
Wednesday, 22 September 2010 17:46
On September 18, 2010 members of Mount Tom Lodge and Mount Holyoke Lodge participated in a community service project by painting the wrought iron fence on the Hampshire Street side of Wistariahurst.  It was a tedious project but with about 8 members from both lodges we nearly completed the project.  Photos below show Wor. Robert O'Neill and some of the other artists hard at work during the day.  Another day is scheduled for October to complete the project.

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In the photos above we see Wor. Bob O'Neill,  Bro. Tyler Sevey, Bro. Kevin O'Connor, Rt. Wor. Neil D. McElwey, Wor. Scott Ryer also helping out form Mount Tom Lodge but not in the photos are Brothers Mathew Peterson and Rt. Wor. John M. Gauger.
 
The Spirit of Masonry PDF Print E-mail
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Freemasonry - Little Known Facts
Written by From Masonic Vibes   
Sunday, 05 September 2010 12:30

alt
An old man, travelling a long highway,

Came at the evening, cold and grey,

To a chasm vast and deep and wide.

 The old man crossed in the twilight dim,

The sullen stream had no fear for him;

But he turned when safe on the other side,

And built a bridge to span the tide.

 "Old man", cried a fellow pilgrim near,

"You are wasting your strength when building here       

Your journey will end with the ending day;

You never again will pass this way.

You've crossed the chasm, deep and wide,

Why build you this bridge at eventide?"

 The builder lifted his old, grey head;

"Good friend, in the path I have come," he said,

"There follows after me to-day,

A youth whose feet must pass this way.

 This chasm, that has been as naught to me, 

To that fair-haired youth may a pitfall be;

He, too, must cross in the twilight dim – 
Good friend, I have built this bridge for him."   

 
Fathers Lodge PDF Print E-mail
The Lodge - Latest
Written by From Masonic Vibs   
Tuesday, 24 August 2010 16:00

Father′s lodge, I well remember, wasn′t large, as lodges go;

There was trouble in December getting to it through the snow.

But he seldom missed a meeting; drifts or blossoms in the lane,

Still the Tyler heard his greeting, winter ice or summer rain.

Father′s lodge thought nothing of it; ′mid their labors and their cares

Those old Masons learned to love it, that fraternity of theirs.

What′s a bit of stormy weather, when a little down the road

Men are gathering together, helping bear each other′s load?

Father′s lodge had made a village; men of father′s sturdy brawn

Turned a wilderness to tillage, seized the flag, and carried on.

Made a village, built a city, shaped a county, formed a state.

Simple men, not wise nor witty––humble men, and yet how great!

Father′s lodge had caught the gleaming of the great Masonic past;

Thinking, toiling, daring, dreaming, they were builders of the last.

Quiet men, not rich nor clever, with the tools they found at hand

Building for the great forever, first a village, then a land.

Father′s lodge no temple builded, shaped of steel and carved of stone;

Marble columns, ceilings gilded, father′s lodge has never known.

But a heritage of glory they have left, the humble ones––

They have left their mighty story in the keeping of their sons.

 
Kitchen Project Continues PDF Print E-mail
The Lodge - Latest
Written by JMG   
Sunday, 01 August 2010 14:27

alt alt

To finish the kitchen project a group of dedicated Masons, and their friends have been working Friday evenings.  The work consists of emptying the cabinets of all dishes, washing them and putting them in bags for storage until needed.  The outer wall of cabinets were not finished last year and still require painting.  This evening we continued with washing and sorting the dishes and washing the insides of the cabinets to get them ready for painting.  There are still some dishes that need to be washed but the cabinets are now ready for painting and with another good turnout of volunteers we should have the project complete in one more evening.  We will be meeting again on August 13th at 6:30 PM

Pictured above are Worshipful Scot Ryer, Brother Dan Peirce, Kirsten Neale, Rebecca Long and Brother Tyler Seavy.  Not seen but there drying dishes is Brother Gary Peterson.

 

 
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RESTORED TO LIGHT E-mail

A faint light shining for a space;
A breath of wind upon the face;
A stirring in the mist; a sigh;
A sense of distance, height and sky;
A little wave of melody !
O but how beautiful to see
The light leaf dance upon the tree,
The bloom upon the hedgerow stirr'd
By the transport of a singing bird,
And - after darkness and eclipse-
The sun upon the sails of ships,
All up and down the dancing sea !
O but how beautiful to hear
A little whisper in the ear,
A smaller voice than note of bird,
A still small voice, a mighty word,
A whisper in the heart to say
That God is not so far away !

- A. E. Waite.

 
What Freemasonry means to me. E-mail
What Freemasonry means to me.

I recently received a letter in which the writer asked: "Why are you a Freemason?" The question caused me to think and reaffirm my feelings about Masonry. At first I thought about my own forebears. My grandfather was a Mason for 50 years, my father for 50 years, and I have been a Mason for 60 years. This means that my tie with Freemasonry extends back to 1869 when my grandfather joined the Masons. My feelings on my first entrance into a Masonic Lodge are very clear in memory. I was a young man and it was a great thrill to kneel before the altar of the Lodge to become a Freemason. This must have been the same feeling my father and grandfather experienced before me.

And it must also have been identical to the one that many great leaders of America and the world felt as they became Masons. Prominent among this select group are George Washington, Harry Truman, and 12 other Presidents as well as countless statesmen and benefactors of humanity. So I found myself thinking: "What does Freemasonry mean to me?"

Of course Masons say that Freemasonry actually begins in each individual Mason's heart. I take this to mean a response to brotherhood and the highest ideals. I recall the story of a man who came to me once and said: "I see that you are a Freemason. So am I."

As we talked, he told me of an experience he had years ago. It seems that he joined the Masonic Fraternity shortly after he became 21 years old. When he was stationed in the military, he decided to attend various Lodge meetings. On his first visit to a Lodge in a strange city, he was a bit nervous. One thought was constantly in his mind; could he pass the examination to show that he was a Mason? As the committee was carefully examining his credentials, one of the members looked him squarely in the eye and said: "Obviously you know the Ritual, so you can enter our Lodge as a Brother Mason. But I have one more question. Where were you made a Mason?" With that he told the young visitor to think about it because when he knew the answer the examiner would not have to hear it. He would see it in his eyes.

My friend told me that after a couple of minutes a big smile came to his face and he looked at the examiner, who said: "That's right, in your heart." "Through Masonic teachings, good men practice love and charity. As a Fraternity they spend millions of dollars..." Freemasonry is not a religion though, in my experience, Masons have predominately been religious men and, for the most part, of the Christian faith.

Through Freemasonry, however, I have had opportunity to break bread with good men of other than my own Christian faith. Freemasonry does not promote any one religious creed. All Masons believe in the Deity without reservation. However, Masonry makes no demands as to how a member thinks of the Great Architect of the Universe. Freemasonry is, for all its members, a supplement to good living which has enhanced the lives of millions who have entered its doors. Though it is not a religion, as such, it supplements faith in God the Creator. It is supporting of morality and virtue.

Freemasonry has no dogma or theology. It offers no sacraments. It teaches that it is important for every man to have a religion of his own choice and to be faithful to it in thought and action. As a result, men of different religions meet in fellowship and brotherhood under the fatherhood of God. I think that a good Mason is made even more faithful to the tenets of his faith by his membership in the Lodge.

Freemasonry is much more than a social organization. Through Masonic teachings, good men practice love and charity. As a Fraternity they spend millions of dollars to support hospitals, childhood language disorders clinics, and research into problems that plague man's physical and mental being. Whenever I visit a Masonic hospital, of which there are many, my eyes fill with tears. As I see a youngster, who could not walk, now able to get from one end of the corridor to the other with the aid of an artificial leg, I am thrilled. For a young person to have the opportunity to become whole and productive is to me exciting and wonderful. And this opportunity is given at no cost to his or her family or the state. Living is beautiful but sometimes life can be harsh and cruel.

Whenever or wherever people are in need Masons are there to help. From large undertakings to the smallest of needs, Masons are always there, caring and serving. I have always been interested as to why Masons devote so much time to their Fraternity. A good answer to this question came from a Grand Master who once told me that he enjoys his involvement because it gives him another dimension to living.

The same answer is echoed by Brethren as they meet in Lodge rooms from one end of our Country to the other and around the world. Many of my best friends, associates, and fellow Christians are Freemasons and good churchmen as well. In my travels at home and abroad a goodly number of Freemasons notice my Masonic ring, which I always wear. With pride they say: "I, too, am a Freemason." To me, Freemasonry is one form of dedication to God and service to humanity. I too was a Freemason in my heart and so I will remain. I am proud of my involvement. I am proud to walk in fraternal fellowship with my Brethren.

By The Reverend Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, 33*
 
About Us E-mail

This is the website of Mount Tom Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons located in Holyoke, Massachusetts.

Mount Tom Lodge was established on March 14th, 1850 (the same date the city of Holyoke was incorporated as a town) when it was granted a Warrant from the Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachusetts.

The building seen in the photo above was begun in 1920 and completed the following year.  Our museum has many photos of the conerstone laying ceremony (which we will soon have online).